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Topic: Bell getting out
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brandon1

2/19/2008 11:08:23 AM
Member since:
May 2007
Total posts:661
Bell getting out

Bell, who was jailed for her part in the murder of RCMP officer Strongquill is getting out of jail after serving 2/3's of her sentence.  
 
Apparently it is a mandatory release.  
 
She has been in trouble since she went to jail, violence and fighting seem to be the big thing. She has not shown remorse for her actions, and thinks her sentence is too harsh.  
 
Jail officials have said that she is a high risk to reoffend.  
 
So, why are they letting her out? What the hell is a mandatory release after 2/3's of your sentence?  
 
This is for the murder of an RCMP! If the system behaves this way when it is one of their own that is murdered, what do they do when it is you or me?

 
 
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Kory

2/19/2008 12:10:23 PM
Member since:
Jan 2006
Total posts:296
absolutely outrageous

The fact that she's even considered to be released is an absolute travesty.  
 
This just goes to show exactly how our justice system works. If you kill an RCMP officer, you will get a legitimate slap on the wrist.  
 
Why don't people uprise over this decision? Because she's a minority. If it was me committing that crime, getting 7 years and if I was at a risk to re-offend, i'd be in jail for years to come. It's absolute garbage.  
 
 
"The Correctional Service of Canada has the authority to refuse statutory release in case where the offender is deemed an imminent danger to society, but has not opposed Bell’s release, even though the Parole Board has found her to pose an “undue risk to commit a violent offence.”  
The parole board has imposed conditions that they hope will protect the public as she resumes living in her home province of Alberta."  
 
 
makes me want to puke.

ChristyK

2/19/2008 12:31:29 PM
Member since:
Aug 2007
Total posts:446
article

http://www.cbc.ca/canada/manitoba/story/2008/02/19/strongquill.html  
 
I read this article on the CBC. Haven't had a chance to check any others yet. I wish I knew what aspect of the current legislation makes it automatic to parole her. Why give a full sentence if it can't be acted on? They talk about the extra conditions they've put on the parole, which I guess is a chance to pull her back in for parole violations.  
 
Either way, I think this woman should be serving the full time. It's ridiculous to turn her out. If anyone knows what loophole it is that's allowing this please point me in the direction so I can be informed.

SJK

2/19/2008 1:00:47 PM
Member since:
Jul 2006
Total posts:4044
I think it is considered

  
ChristyK said "http://www.cbc.ca/canada/manitoba/story/2008/02/19/strongquill.html  
 
I read this article on the CBC. Haven't had a chance to check any others yet. I wish I knew what aspect of the current legislation makes it automatic to parole her. Why give a full sentence if it can't be acted on? They talk about the extra conditions they've put on the parole, which I guess is a chance to pull her back in for parole violations.  
 
Either way, I think this woman should be serving the full time. It's ridiculous to turn her out. If anyone knows what loophole it is that's allowing this please point me in the direction so I can be informed."

the full sentence as she spent 18 months pretrial custody which they get double time for. I was called for jury duty on this case. Thank goodness I was dismissed on the second last group left.

the late bcglorf

2/19/2008 1:12:07 PM
Member since:
Sep 2006
Total posts:1558
looked up some of it

  
SJK said "
  
ChristyK said "http://www.cbc.ca/canada/manitoba/story/2008/02/19/strongquill.html  
 
I read this article on the CBC. Haven't had a chance to check any others yet. I wish I knew what aspect of the current legislation makes it automatic to parole her. Why give a full sentence if it can't be acted on? They talk about the extra conditions they've put on the parole, which I guess is a chance to pull her back in for parole violations.  
 
Either way, I think this woman should be serving the full time. It's ridiculous to turn her out. If anyone knows what loophole it is that's allowing this please point me in the direction so I can be informed."

the full sentence as she spent 18 months pretrial custody which they get double time for. I was called for jury duty on this case. Thank goodness I was dismissed on the second last group left. "

Actually, it's not pretrial credit.  
Apparently there is a rule that for every 2 days in prison you are credited 1 day toward your mandatory parole date. When your credited days are greater than the remainder of your sentence you get mandatory parole. The parole board can't reject it, irregardless of the inmate's behaviour and likelihood to re-offend! The most they get to do is set conditions on the guaranteed parole.  
That this kind of clause exists in our system makes me utterly disgusted. We need massive reforms to ridiculous laws like this! It's bad enough rapists and murders can get 20 year sentences. They also get mandatory parole in just over 13.

ChristyK

2/19/2008 2:16:41 PM
Member since:
Aug 2007
Total posts:446
SJK

the pretrial credit (18 months=3 years) went towards the 10 year sentence. So she was supposed to still serve 7 technically. However, she's only served 2/3's of that 7 years. So really, all things considered it's about 1/2 the original sentence in actual jail time.  
 
My friend served on this jury and it disturbed her a great deal. Of course, she was unable to speak of it to anyone but it took a toll on her emotionally. Now if as a jury member it caused strain, imagine the victims. I agree with Strongquill's partner, they should have been consulted. Perhaps with victim impact statements they could have reversed it.  
 
I guess the part I don't get is why with some murderers they have conditional parole and others have mandatory. IMO, all murderers should have a conditional parole and prove why they should be let out. Shouldn't be like this.

the late bcglorf

2/19/2008 2:39:06 PM
Member since:
Sep 2006
Total posts:1558
mandatory parole

  
ChristyK said "the pretrial credit (18 months=3 years) went towards the 10 year sentence. So she was supposed to still serve 7 technically. However, she's only served 2/3's of that 7 years. So really, all things considered it's about 1/2 the original sentence in actual jail time.  
 
My friend served on this jury and it disturbed her a great deal. Of course, she was unable to speak of it to anyone but it took a toll on her emotionally. Now if as a jury member it caused strain, imagine the victims. I agree with Strongquill's partner, they should have been consulted. Perhaps with victim impact statements they could have reversed it.  
 
I guess the part I don't get is why with some murderers they have conditional parole and others have mandatory. IMO, all murderers should have a conditional parole and prove why they should be let out. Shouldn't be like this."

Actually, all inmates have both conditional and mandatory parole. The parole board can turn down conditional paroles. Mandatory parole can't be turned down by the parole board. So if you get life with no parole for 7 years, you have to go before the parole board after 7 years and be approved by them. After 66 years though, you get mandatory parole and the board can't turn it down.  
From what I can see it looks as though all prison sentences are actually for 2/3 of the sentenced time, with 1/3 of the time under conditional release at the end. Absolutely outrageous.

FYR FYTR

2/19/2008 3:36:04 PM
Member since:
Nov 2007
Total posts:94
As someone

who works in the system, it's pretty sad... The fact that it's even called the "JUSTICE" system is a joke.  
Find a judge willing to give a sentence that even comes close to what most of us would deem fair and I'll bet there's some bleeding heart out there that says "They didn't deserve that..."  
Although most of us are content to rant on discussion forums like this, unfortunately there are NOT many of us willing to actually take a stand and have our voices heard. Everyone is content just to say, "Oh, I can't believe that...", yet no-one actually takes the time to do anything about it, if they did we would have nothing to complain about.  
 
I agree with all these posts stating that Bell shouldn't be released, yet if even one in ten knew who IS being released, on a regular basis, there would be h*** to pay. There are pedophiles, rapists and murderers being released, not just in the big cities, but Brandon as well, on an almost weekly basis. How do I know? I have worked at the jail for more than 10 years and witness it regularly.  
There are persons convicted for "serious" offences, including aggravated sexual assault, who have received nothing more than intermittent (weekend) sentences from local judges... I guess these creeps are only a threat during the weekend so can remain in the community during the week.  
Don't believe me? Do a little research on line, the info is there for those that know where to look.  
I am not saying Bell should get out, just that if we ever want things to change, WE need to unite and have something done about it, not just gripe in the daily forums.

the late bcglorf

2/19/2008 3:54:45 PM
Member since:
Sep 2006
Total posts:1558
Thank you, LawN4Sir

Until today I wasn't even aware of statutory release.It utterly disgusts me and I'm sure most of the people I know as well.  
Bell's release date is March 18, and it's much too late to do anything about it. I think this is an opportunity though to protest down in front of the courthouse to have statutory release eliminated altogether. I'm gonna take some time to put together something more specific. Anybody interested in helping or who has suggestions can email me at bcglorfindel@gmail.com

-

2/19/2008 4:11:01 PM
Member since:
Jun 2007
Total posts:2247
Interesting post

  
LawN4Sir said "who works in the system, it's pretty sad... The fact that it's even called the "JUSTICE" system is a joke.  
Find a judge willing to give a sentence that even comes close to what most of us would deem fair and I'll bet there's some bleeding heart out there that says "They didn't deserve that..."  
Although most of us are content to rant on discussion forums like this, unfortunately there are NOT many of us willing to actually take a stand and have our voices heard. Everyone is content just to say, "Oh, I can't believe that...", yet no-one actually takes the time to do anything about it, if they did we would have nothing to complain about.  
 
I agree with all these posts stating that Bell shouldn't be released, yet if even one in ten knew who IS being released, on a regular basis, there would be h*** to pay. There are pedophiles, rapists and murderers being released, not just in the big cities, but Brandon as well, on an almost weekly basis. How do I know? I have worked at the jail for more than 10 years and witness it regularly.  
There are persons convicted for "serious" offences, including aggravated sexual assault, who have received nothing more than intermittent (weekend) sentences from local judges... I guess these creeps are only a threat during the weekend so can remain in the community during the week.  
Don't believe me? Do a little research on line, the info is there for those that know where to look.  
I am not saying Bell should get out, just that if we ever want things to change, WE need to unite and have something done about it, not just gripe in the daily forums."

Thank you for the honesty. Truth is people are becoming less naive and seeing the system for 'what it really is' these days so the above post reflects the current state of our "justice" system. I have done work for the law and also witnessed much of the same and have heard from others the injustice. FOr example someone who beats their child black and blue and decides that they just won't bother with the conditions of anger management and counselling and no one steps in to enforce these in any way (this is a Brandon male too). He's clean cut and white, you'd never suspect (maybe thats why he got off easy, also by being charming). The offender likely laughed at the system and by the way, gained custody on a weekly basis WITHOUT completing the above conditions. Sad, I know. Sure he gets on the child abuse registry but is unable to learn of ways to correct his serious behavior when the law couldn't care less if he completed his Province of MB stated conditions. Doesn't matter if they beat childrenn with fists or objects, murder someone or are a pedophile, the system protects the offender and lets them go. ANyone can fake remorse and good behavior. The system is unable to change dangerous behavior because they their actions at times show they couldn't care less by way of soft sentences and handing out jail free cards. Ofcourse there are many in the legal system who are tough but those who aren't are putting us innocent adults and children at risk.

matty

2/19/2008 9:20:35 PM
Member since:
Mar 2005
Total posts:301
2 months

tops...before she re-offends. words can't describe the embarassment and disappointment i feel from our justice system right now...

loni_rose

2/20/2008 10:25:58 AM
Member since:
Apr 2007
Total posts:242
some points of view...

below I pasted a link to a 3 part feature that 'the current' did on the prison system...in the last part they discuss the 'samson' report that I think I am goign to read more about: I like the idea of 'mandatory programs' that they are proposing  
 
 
http://www.cbc.ca/thecurrent/2008/200801/20080123.html  
 

-

2/20/2008 11:22:00 AM
Member since:
Jun 2007
Total posts:2247
..

I actually have a huge respect for the law and the people who work within the system but have lost some faith due to scenerios like this one mentioned. Some people do receive the treatment and turnaround they need to live better lives because of the efforts made but did Bell learn the lesson and get enough transformation in this time frame? Whenever I read the paper its hopeful to see a medium or high risk offender getting jail time instead of alternative measures but then disapointed to see that they are out so quick..is that justice served?  
 
Yes treatment/programs are offered which is a step in the right direction but remember, every high risk offender started out low risk. IMO, low risk should be treated as high risk with maximum treatment followed through completely and tougher conditions, no exceptions. Not just a slap on the wrist, they need the tools to be transformed before negative behavior grows, however long it may take. I think there are a number of low risk often getting lost in the system, aren't considered too much worry so they are let go giving them opportunity to reach a new level. A lot of them start off small with a couple b and e's or simple assault and the more they get away with these, the more confident they get to take more chances since 'the law doesn't apply to them'. Before they know it they may see a jail cell but then are back on the streets surprisingly early when just maybe they were making process. THe point is, the tougher the justice, the more offenders of all types will suffer the consquences and maybe even think twice. Knowing they can get out of jail early more often than not is not the best message to send. Ofcourse every sitation is different but tough is the way to improving the current system. Not to say that toughness isn't out there but consistant toughness is not. Anyone have any suggestions or other thoughts? Jail isn't always the answer but those who murder, IMO should not be out early.

the late bcglorf

2/20/2008 11:47:14 AM
Member since:
Sep 2006
Total posts:1558
early release

Early release for good behavior has a place in the legal system. Sadly, the clause that is getting Bell out has absolutely nothing to with that.  
 
Statutory parole is granted automatically after 2/3 off a sentence has been served. This has absolutely no place in any justice system. The parole board exists to judge which inmates are and are not fit/safe to receive an early release. To automatically bypass that board at 2/3 of a sentence is an insult to every victim. Better than 10% (by stats canada) of people given statutory parole commit new crimes while out on parole. Less than 40% actually make it through their parole period without being sent back to jail for violations. It's appalling and disgusting. Prisoner reformation has it's place, but blanket release of all inmates after serving 2/3 of their sentence is not a reform policy.  
Statutory release must be completely abolished.

-

2/20/2008 12:23:39 PM
Member since:
Jun 2007
Total posts:2247
Reforming and early release

What happened to the bread and water days..jail has tv, three course meals and what other luxuries? Unfortantly there is no simple fix to an overworked justice system who needs more manpower to be a force and tougher judges, tougher consquences etc. - all this could be done without changing the laws (though the current early release system is not ideal). While on the bus to Ontario one long weekend the bus stopped for someone whom just got released from federal maximum. After threatening the bus driver, he was arrested with a big fight at a donut shop, every Police car in town was there (not because of the donuts but to catch the guy). All our safety had been at jeopardy, this is an example of someone immune to the system or was out to early on parole and hadn't reformed. Also temporary absences should not be rewarded, what kind of jail is that?  
 
And obvoiusly Bell hasn't reformed if is being violent in jail and high risk to reoffend..looks like jail really does the job.

Nordberg

2/20/2008 1:14:16 PM
Member since:
Apr 2005
Total posts:4072
So how...

is she getting out and Latimer is not.  
 
Parole board playing politics?

Brenda

2/20/2008 1:15:49 PM
Member since:
Jul 2005
Total posts:7524
I was thinking the same thing...

about Latimer - but was too afraid to bring that discussion up again.

the late bcglorf

2/20/2008 1:48:09 PM
Member since:
Sep 2006
Total posts:1558
Latimer

The difference is that he is applying for day parole. Statutory release doesn't apply to life sentences, so he won't get to by-pass the parole board like Bell is.  
 
The problem in Bell's case is the Parole board does not have any say. Because she has served 2/3 of her sentence, she gets parole no matter how strongly the Parole board objects.

-

2/21/2008 9:23:50 AM
Member since:
Jun 2007
Total posts:2247
..

I respect the law yet have a hard time with what goes on at times. As Mayor of Winnipeg said right now there are no consquences.  
 
People can protest about bees dying but not about protecting humans from risk of harm. Has anyone started a petition to let the gov't know that this isn't being taken lightly?


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